To guarantee every seal we repair is fit for purpose, we need to check the seal specification is correct for the application, explains NASH’s Geoff Farnworth

geoff_farnworth_nash

I would like to apologise in advance for asking you so many questions!

However, your answers will help us to diagnose the root cause of any mechanical seal problem, optimise future performance, extend seal life and minimise your costs.

Fifty years of experience has shown us that no two similar seal failures are ever quite the same. Our approach to repairing or upgrading individual seals is similarly bespoke. That calls for data … and explains why I have to ask you questions!

Information’s added benefits

Good information brings other bonuses. NASH puts its name on every serviced seal leaving our workshops. This guarantees its future performance will be as good as that of a ‘new seal’. But to do this we need accurate information.

Before work begins, we send you a unique NASH inspection report. In it you will find photographs of damage identified during a workshop strip-down, an itemised parts list detailing the condition of all components, failure analysis where appropriate, along with advice, recommendations and our fully-costed service proposals. Again, quality in equals quality out.

Application details

How does this all work in practice? When your damaged seals first reach NASH, it is my responsibility to investigate how they were used.

First off, I will ask you about application, or duty, conditions – operating speed, temperature, product and pressure. If you can confirm that these haven’t changed, no further action is needed.

However, even small changes can have major implications.

For example, your process may have changed since the seal was first installed. This could mean that the original construction materials are no longer suitable. Running equipment at different speeds, or changes in operating temperature, creates problems too.

In more extreme cases, we may find that the seal design is not appropriate for the application you are using it for.

First-hand observations

In addition, I will talk to you about noises, rattles, leaks, barrier fluid losses (for a double seal) and unexplained temperature rises you noticed prior to seal failure. These can be important pointers.

Any service history details you provide will be useful too – for example, how long has the seal been in service, or how long do seals normally last on this application? Every little helps.

General Arrangement (GA) drawing

Finally, I must ask you for the original manufacturer’s GA drawing that came with your seal. If you don’t have it, don’t worry. We can still help you.

We create a NASH GA drawing for every seal we handle. Having original GA helps us to confirm quickly original application details the seal was designed for, plus the original materials used in its components.

In the absence of an original GA drawing, the NASH GA drawing will take a little longer to create. However, we are highly skilled in identifying mechanical seal materials of construction. Combining this with current application details allows us to determine whether better alternatives would improve seal performance and life.

Total information

I hope this shows why we put a premium on high-quality information. Please bear with me. I am trying to make life easier for everyone!

Sometimes, I’m told that ‘OEMs don’t ask so many questions’. However, we feel this opens the door to compromise when higher standards are possible.

We are proud of NASH’s proactive approach to minimising the likelihood of similar problems occurring again. That’s important when valuable production time is at stake.

To guarantee every seal we repair is fit for purpose, we need to check the seal specification is correct for the application, explains NASH’s Geoff Farnworth

geoff_farnworth_nash

I would like to apologise in advance for asking you so many questions!

However, your answers will help us to diagnose the root cause of any mechanical seal problem, optimise future performance, extend seal life and minimise your costs.

Fifty years of experience has shown us that no two similar seal failures are ever quite the same. Our approach to repairing or upgrading individual seals is similarly bespoke. That calls for data … and explains why I have to ask you questions!

Information’s added benefits

Good information brings other bonuses. NASH puts its name on every serviced seal leaving our workshops. This guarantees its future performance will be as good as that of a ‘new seal’. But to do this we need accurate information.

Before work begins, we send you a unique NASH inspection report. In it you will find photographs of damage identified during a workshop strip-down, an itemised parts list detailing the condition of all components, failure analysis where appropriate, along with advice, recommendations and our fully-costed service proposals. Again, quality in equals quality out.

Application details

How does this all work in practice? When your damaged seals first reach NASH, it is my responsibility to investigate how they were used.

First off, I will ask you about application, or duty, conditions – operating speed, temperature, product and pressure. If you can confirm that these haven’t changed, no further action is needed.

However, even small changes can have major implications.

For example, your process may have changed since the seal was first installed. This could mean that the original construction materials are no longer suitable. Running equipment at different speeds, or changes in operating temperature, creates problems too.

In more extreme cases, we may find that the seal design is not appropriate for the application you are using it for.

First-hand observations

In addition, I will talk to you about noises, rattles, leaks, barrier fluid losses (for a double seal) and unexplained temperature rises you noticed prior to seal failure. These can be important pointers.

Any service history details you provide will be useful too – for example, how long has the seal been in service, or how long do seals normally last on this application? Every little helps.

General Arrangement (GA) drawing

Finally, I must ask you for the original manufacturer’s GA drawing that came with your seal. If you don’t have it, don’t worry. We can still help you.

We create a NASH GA drawing for every seal we handle. Having original GA helps us to confirm quickly original application details the seal was designed for, plus the original materials used in its components.

In the absence of an original GA drawing, the NASH GA drawing will take a little longer to create. However, we are highly skilled in identifying mechanical seal materials of construction. Combining this with current application details allows us to determine whether better alternatives would improve seal performance and life.

Total information

I hope this shows why we put a premium on high-quality information. Please bear with me. I am trying to make life easier for everyone!

Sometimes, I’m told that ‘OEMs don’t ask so many questions’. However, we feel this opens the door to compromise when higher standards are possible.

We are proud of NASH’s proactive approach to minimising the likelihood of similar problems occurring again. That’s important when valuable production time is at stake.